L'œuvre "Untitled" (Last Light) - Centre Pompidou

L'œuvre

"Untitled" (Last Light)

Keywords :

concept.resource

Reproduction d'une œuvre

Crédit photographique : © Georges Meguerditchian - Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI /Dist. RMN-GP
© The Felix Gonzales-Torres Foundation

À propos de l'œuvre

Felix Gonzalez Torres (1957 - 1996)

"Untitled" (Last Light)

1993

Description de l'ampoule : 10 watts 120 volts G9 Candelabra Screw (E12) Base Satin White Globe Decor Incandescent Westinghouse Light Bulb Spécifications : Westinghouse 03864 Voltage: 120 volts Wattage: 10 watts Détails techniques : Color/Finish: Satin White Average Lifetime: 1500 hours Lumens (light output): 50

Inscriptions :sur le certificat

Published by A.R.T. Press, Los Angeles and Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York

Achat, 2010

Numéro d'inventaire : AM 2010-258

Description for the presentation 2011 in the National Museum of Modern Art

Having settled in the United States in 1979, the Cuban-born American artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres made plentiful but critical use of Conceptual and Minimalist forms of art, combining political militancy, a poetics of emotion, and formal reflection, using ordinary materials to extraordinary ends. A simple electrical wire punctuated by 24 bulbs, Untitled (Last Light) prompts a certain melancholy. A memorial for his partner Ross Laycock, who died of AIDS in 1991, the work symbolizes the endless cycle of life and death, the passage of time though the 24 hours of day and night.

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Description for the presentation 2014 in the National Museum of Modern Art

The work of Cuban-born artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres, whose family emigrated to the United States in 1979, revolves around themes both personal and political, such as racism, homophobia, history and international politics. Inspired by Christmas decorations, his light-bulb installations suggest both celebration and memorial. Untitled (Last Light) alludes to his friend Ross Laycock’s death from AIDS in 1991, evoking not only death but also renewal, bulbs always being replaced as they burn out.

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Description for the presentation 2018 in the National Museum of Modern Art

Influenced by Minimal and Conceptual Art, Félix González-Torres dealt with themes both personal and political, such as racism and homophobia. He began making installations of light bulbs strung together in 1991, the year when his partner died of AIDS. Untitled (Last Light) symbolizes the endless cycle of life and the passage of time, evoked by the 24 bulbs corresponding to the hours of the day. The idea of loss and renewal is also materialised by the inevitable failure of the bulbs, which are continuously replaced. The work is inhabited by a certain melancholy, poised as it is between the s...

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