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Exhibition / Museum

Politiques de l'art

29 Sep 2016 - 2 Apr 2017

The event is over

Tatline Vladimir (d'après), « Maquette du Monument à la Troisième Internationale », 1919 / 1979

What could a political art be? In committing itself to a cause, however noble, doesn’t art risk becoming an instrument of propaganda? Yet can art remain aloof from the great struggles of its time, refuse to align itself with – even participate in – needed movements to change the world?
In the museum, the new sequence of dossier exhibitions that punctuate the visitor’s route through the modern collections offers a series of deliberately partial answers to these questions, rooted in the specificities of the case studies that draw on the collections of the Musée National d’Art Moderne and the Bibliothèque Kandinsky. These varied mini-exhibitions – which range from the 1910s to the late1960s – look at the way in which artists, each in his or her own way, have responded concretely to the problem of the political in their artistic practice.

Beginning with a room devoted to Ubu Roi – that grotesque embodiment of power, emblem of the stupidity and egotistical cruelty of the tyrant – the first section of the sequence focuses on the politicisation of the arts during the October Revolution. The newly established Soviet government, via Anatoly Lunacharsky, people’s commissar for education, asked artists to “spread revolutionary ways of thinking, feeling and acting throughout the country”. Featured here are their responses: patriotic lubki, “ROSTA windows” propaganda posters, the invention of “factography”, utopian architecture, and Rodchenko’s proposed Workers’ Club.
The second section looks at the experience in France when many artists became politically engaged from the late 1920s onward. A room devoted to the Association des Écrivains et Artistes Révolutionnaires (AEAR), established in 1932 under the leadership of Louis Aragon, has a pendant in a display devoted to architect Adalberto Libera, one of the generation of Italian Rationalists whose work was influenced by Fascist ideology. Socialist realism à la française, defined by the dogmatic line adopted by the French Communist Party in the early years of the Cold War, is analysed in the light of works by André Fougeron and Boris Taslitzky and the “affair of Picasso’s Stalin portrait”. André Breton finds his place in this section, on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of his death, with a special display focussing on the political commitments of the founder of Surrealism.
The sequence terminates in the 1960s. The Situationist International, founded in 1957, is presented through the tools developed by its members, among them Guy Debord, Asger Jorn, Constant, and Giuseppe Pinot-Gallizio: industrial painting, détournement, dérive, and unitary urbanism. The events of May 1968, in which the SI played a significant role, are evoked through the poster, the favoured medium of this multifaceted “politics in art”.

Ubu Roi - The grotesque tyrant
(curators : Angela Lampe, Élisabeth Jobin and Valérie Gross)
Salle 2

From Neo-Primitivism to Cubo-Futurism
(curator : Angela Lampe)
Salle 3

The patriotic "lubok"
(curators : Nicolas Liucci-Goutnikov, Julie Champion, Louise Legeleux and Valérie Gross)
Traverse 3

The Rosta Windows
(curators : Nicolas Liucci-Goutnikov, Julie Champion, Louise Legeleux and Valérie Gross)
Traverse 4

The invention of factography
(curators : Nicolas Liucci-Goutnikov, Julie Champion, Louise Legeleux, Valérie Gross and Natacha Milovzorova)
Traverse 4

Wassily Kandinsky (1866-1944): the return to Russia (1914-1921)
(curators : Christian Briend and Anne Lemonnier)
Traverse 5

Soviet architecture : asserting a new aesthetic
(curators : Camille Lenglois and Valérie Gross)
Traverse 5 bis

Natalia Goncharova and Le Populaire: views of the working world
(curators : Nicolas Liucci-Goutnikov and Vanessa Noizet)
Traverse 6

Documenting social life
(curators : Clément Chéroux, Julie Jones and Vanessa Noizet)
Traverse 6 bis

Painting and exhibiting under the Occupation : "Young Painters of French Tradition"
(curators : Nicolas Liucci-Goutnikov, Vanessa Noizet and Aurélien Bernard)
Traverse 7

Art and Communist Party
(curators : Nicolas Liucci-Goutnikov, Camille Morando, Didier Schulmann, Vanessa Noizet and Aurélien Bernard)
Traverse 8

Social housing: a challenge for Edouard Menkès
(curators : Camille Lenglois and Karine Bomel)
Traverse 8 bis

Forms of activism during the 1960s - The power of the poster: less is more
(curators : Nicolas Liucci-Goutnikov, Julie Champion, Louise Legeleux and Aurélien Bernard)
Traverse 10

Alexander Rodchenko's Workers Club
(curators : Nicolas Liucci-Goutnikov, Julie Champion, Louise Legeleux and Valérie Gross)
Salle 12

Do not visit the Colonial Exhibition
(curators : Jean-Michel Bouhours, Camille Morando and Chloé Goualc’h)
Salle 21

The AEAR (Association of Revolutionary Writers and Artists)
(curators : Clément Chéroux, Nicolas Liucci-Goutnikov, Julie Jones, Vanessa Noizet and Chloé Goualc’h)
Salle 22

Adalberto Libera, ambiguities of Italian rationalism
(curator : Olivier Cinqualbre Salle 24

French-style socialist realism (1947-1953): a Party art
(curators : Nicolas Liucci-Goutnikov, Camille Morando, Didier Schulmann, Vanessa Noizet and Aurélien Bernard)
Salle 25

The Situationist International
(curators : Nicolas Liucci-Goutnikov, Julie Champion, Louise Legeleux, Aurélien Bernard and Chloé Goualc’h)
Salle 34

Team Ten
(curator : Camille Lenglois)
Salle 38

When


29 Sep 2016 - 2 Apr 2017
11h - 21h, every days except tuesdays

Where

Musée - Niveau 5 - Centre Pompidou, Cinéma 2